Garden Sanitation

After cold temperatures set in, most gardeners are nestled in their warm homes thumbing  through gardening magazines and dreaming of next years’ garden.  If good sanitation is not done this fall, the nasty’s that are left in the garden may come back to wreak havoc next planting season.  Pull on the thermals and get your garden in tip top condition by giving it a good cleaning .

When I say the nasty’s I am talking about plant diseases, like potato late blight, which can threaten crops next year.  This disease overwinters in the live tissue of potato tubers and infested potatoes left in the soil, covered with snow, are protected from the freezing temperatures that would normally kill it.  Make sure all potatoes are dug up.  Diseased material should be disposed of but not placed in the compost pile.  Compost piles act as insulators during cold weather and throwing diseased material into it will cause contamination.  Early next spring check the area for volunteer potato plants and dispose of them.  It is recommended to buy clean, certified seed potatoes, rather than planting potatoes saved for seed.

Late blight is spread through the air and from plant to plant under favorable weather  conditions.  It can affect tomato plants and the same sanitation rules apply-clean it up to prevent problems.  Clean up any dropped tomatoes.  Not only are they a potential harbor for disease but if left in the garden, all those little tomato seeds will sprout next spring causing you to have to pull them all out.

Some insects hide under debris such as boards or bricks left in the garden or surrounding area.  Eliminate such debris that might provide shelter from the weather.

The same kind of “clean up” applies to an orchard.  Remove fallen leaves and fruits at the end of the season.  A clean orchard floor is an excellent way to prevent future problems.

Another thing to keep in mind is the possibility of disease carry-over from garden to  garden.  Let’s say you lend a helping hand in Madge’s garden for the afternoon and you use some of your own garden tools.  Soil borne diseases can be transferred between gardens if contaminated soil is left on your tools.  As a preventative measure clean your tools as you use them.   When trimming your woody plants clean your loppers and pruners with isopropyl alcohol after every use to prevent the transfer of pathogens from a sick plant to a healthy one.

Use the gardens down time to research and maybe reconsider the plants you have used in the past.  Many vegetables and flowers offer disease resistant varieties that will stear clear of some of the more common problems.

Preventing a disease before it becomes a problem is easier that trying to get rid of it.  If in doubt, throw it out!

As always, Happy Gardening!

More information about gardening and related subjects is available online.  The Purdue University Cooperative Extension Service can be reached at 499-6334 in LaGrange Co., 636-2111 in Noble Co., 925-2562 in DeKalb Co. and 668-1000 in Steuben Co.

Harvesting Holiday Greens

  by Karen Weiland, Advanced Master Gardener     I like to add to the festive mood of the holidays by using some of my landscape greens to decorate my planters and window boxes.  Wreaths, swags, and garlands can all be made from plants that are commonly found in the home landscape. Some of the …

Read More >

10 Steps to Garden Success

  by Karen Weiland, Advanced Master Gardener     I’m sure many of you will be making seed choices for the upcoming garden planting season as you thumb through the pages of the gardening catalogs that will be landing in your mailbox soon.  Making good seed choices is but one of the many steps that …

Read More >

Animal Damage in Winter Landscape

  by Karen Weiland, Advanced Master Gardener     There is a lot of work that gardeners put into planting and caring for trees and shrubs in the landscape.  One of the most annoying things you can see in the spring is plants that have been gnawed by mice or chewed on by deer and …

Read More >

Get your official copy of our

Destination Guide

Request Printed Guide

View E-Guide

Stay informed and sign up for the

EMAIL-Newsletter

Sign Up